Chord Progressions: Roman Numeral Analysis

Harmonic literacy goes beyond knowing the letter name and type of chord being played to understanding how a chord functions in a particulate context. To that end, a common practice for describing chords in functional harmonic terms is to use Roman Numerals. The naming conventions work like this…

  • Chords are named using the MAJOR SCALE as the point of reference.
  • Each chord assigned a number based on where the root of the chord falls along the scale degrees of the major scale. In the key of C, for example: C=1, D=2, E=3, F=4, G=5, A=6, B=7.
  • Major chords use upper-case Roman Numerals.
  • Minor chords use lower-case Roman Numerals.
  • Diminished Chords use lower-case Roman Numerals with a “degrees” symbol (°) immediately following.
  • Note: Other chord types are possible and will be discussed as they arise in context.

Here, for example, are all the Triads built from the C Major Scale named using Roman Numeral notation:

piano-ology-chord-progressions-roman-numeral-analysis-c-major-scale-triads

In major keys, the I chord establishes both the tonic note and major-ness of the key, while all of the other chords create unique tensions with respect to that key center.


And here are all the Triads built from the C Natural Minor Scale named using Roman Numeral notation. Notice that the major scale is still used as the point of reference:

piano-ology-chord-progressions-roman-numeral-analysis-c-natural-minor-scale-triads

In minor keys, the i chord establishes both the tonic note and minor-ness of the key, while all of the other chords create unique tensions with respect to that key center.


Of course, there are tonalities besides major and minor: “Harmonic ” Minor, Mixolydian, Dorian, Blues, etc) … and there are many other kinds of chords (seventh chords, suspensions, etc) and chord functions (secondary dominants, pivot chords). It may seem like a lot know, but don’t despair.  It is not as hard as you think.  All you need right now is to understand the naming conventions and to start thinking about chords in functional terms.

About Frank J Peter

A uniquely burdened and blessed citizen of the world thinking and acting out loud!
This entry was posted in Aural Comprehension, Chord Progressions, How to Read Music, How to Study-Practice, Music Theory and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

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